Charity

I believe that if youth are given the right support and the right opportunities to thrive that any child can succeed in life no matter what kind of home they are raised in.

Family Resources for Positive Youth Development

MISSION
To provide support and resources to strengthen families under pressure.

VISION
Providing enriching opportunities for families and youth under pressure by creating new opportunities that benefit families and produce positive youth development

PURPOSE
Establishing community partnerships and alliances for the purpose of advancing the conditions of families under pressure by improving relationships that empower families and that promote characteristics of positive youth development

If the mission of this organization resonates with you, please consider supporting their work financially with a tax-deductible donation. The easiest way to do that is through online giving.
It is easy to use, and most of all, it’s secure.
http://frfpyd.org/donate_now.aspx

Research supports our efforts…

THE INCREASE OF YOUTH RAISED IN SINGLE-PARENT FAMILIES
Families headed by single mothers have become one of the largest groups in a growing population of nontraditional families that have diverged from the traditional husband-wife couple; Roberts, et al., 2011). Children born to single mothers have increased from 25% in 1965 to more than 70% today (Whitaker, Whitaker, & Jackson, 2014). Because of our society's increasing changes to family structures, support networks consisting of important non-parental adults (including extended family members, coaches, mentors, teachers, and neighbors) have become increasingly important to helping youth develop positively (Bowers et al., 2014). Important non-parental adults can provide crucial financial, social, and emotional support to families and children, especially single-parent families, and have been found to be connected to increased positive youth development (PYD) (Bowers et al., 2014).

RESEARCH ON POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENT
The goal of PYD-positive youth development is to support youth development by promoting social, moral, emotional, physical, and cognitive growth from important non-parental adults such as family members, coaches, mentors, teachers, leaders, etc. Youth will develop in positive ways with critical support and opportunities for helping them reach their full potential (Taylor et al., 2010).

Positive youth outcomes are the result of the combination of the resources and support available to children and the risk factors that they face relating to their family, friends, schools, and their community environment. PYD is an ideology that stress that all youth are capable of thriving if given the opportunity and support for developing their strengths (Damon, 2004; Scales et al., 2008).

WHAT KIND OF RESOURCES HELP YOUTH DEVELOP POSITIVELY?
Because adolescence is a critical developmental stage wherein events occur that influence the development of emerging adults, Family Resources for Positive Youth Development works towards finding and provided needed resources to youth and families that will provide the kinds of opportunities for positive relationships that research has shown to represent effective intervening and influence for at-risk children and youth across background settings.

OUR WORK IS SPRITUALLY DRIVEN YET, THEORETICALLY GROUNDED
Although our work is based in our hearts' desire to see families and their children strengthened by our efforts. We also, want to ensure that we are effectively contributing to the needs of the families we serve from a best-practices approach. Family Resources for Positive Youth Development operates from two cutting-edge theories: Relational developmental systems theory which focuses on the contributing factors and patterns that shape the development of an individual (e.g., family relations and environmental factors) and Positive Youth Development theory which expects that youth will develop in positive ways with critical support and opportunities for helping them reach their full potential (Taylor et al., 2010). These theories help our organization to understand the importance of contextual factors, like the family and social environment, and how they can promote impactful changes that increase the potential for positive development among youth (Lerner, Agans, DeSouza, & Hersberg, 2014).


References:
Lerner, R.M., Agans, J.P., DeSouza, L. M., & Hershberg, R.M. (2014). Developmental Science in 2025: A predictive review. Research In Human Development, 11(4), 255-272.
Li, J., & Julian, M.M. (2012). Developmental relationships as the active ingredient: A unifying working hypothesis of "what works" across intervention settings. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 82(2),157.